Graduate Students

Name Email Advisor Research
Amy Alstad aalstad@wisc.edu Ellen Damschen Effects of landscape structure and management history on long-term changes in Wisconsin prairie remnants.
Hilary Barker hlbultman@wisc.edu Rick Lindroth Investigating the roles of both intraspecific genetic variation and the environment in structuring populations and communities in plant-insect systems.
Michael Bosch
mbosch@wisc.edu
Tony Ives
 
Kristin Braziunas
braziunas@wisc.edu
Monica Turner
 
Stefanie Buxel-Florenzen buxelflorenz@wisc.edu Warren Porter My research focuses on little brown and big brown bats hibernating in active mines. I am focusing on different conditions within the mines and their effect on hibernating behaviors. I am also looking at how these conditions could influence WNS infection.
Jennifer Chandler jchandler3@wisc.edu John Orrock Trophic cascades, focusing on the effects of predators on small mammal foraging behavior and seed survival.
Olivia Cope ocope@wisc.edu Rick Lindroth
Kara Cromwell kcromwell@wisc.edu Pecarsky/McIntyre My research examines temperate stream ecology, focusing on the interactions of organisms with their natural enemies. My thesis research addresses the causes of nematode parasitism in mayflies, and the consequences of parasitism for food web interactions, such as vulnerability to predation.
Tiago Da Silva Ribeiro tribeiro@wisc.edu Carol Lee
Gavin Dehnert dehnert2@wisc.edu William Karasov
Juanita Diaz
 jdiaz22@wisc.edu Carol Lee
 
Huan Fan hfan22@wisc.edu Tony Ives Alignment and assembly-free phylogenomics using next-generation sequencing data.
Megan Fitzpatrick mjfitzpatric@wisc.edu Warren Porter Exploring Relationships between Energetics and Breeding Failure in Endangered Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) through Mechanistic Modeling.
Rose Graves ragraves@wisc.edu Monica Turner Effects of land-use and climate change on the provision of ecosystem services in a forest-dominated region in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. My research uses empirical and simulation models to explore how changing land use and climate may lead to tradeoffs among cultural, provisioning, and regulating ecosystem services.
Peter Guiden guiden@wisc.edu John Orrock Trophic cascades, focusing on the influence of predators on seed dispersal and foraging behavior in white-tailed deer.
Winslow Hansen whansen3@wisc.edu Monica Turner My Ph.D. research focuses on understanding how wildfire and a changing climate interact to shape tree species assemblages and forest ecosystem resilience in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
Jonathan Henn henn2@wisc.edu Ellen Damschen For my Ph.D. I will be looking at how climate change and fire frequency interact and affect prairie and oak savannah plant communities in Southern Wisconsin. I am interested in using functional traits to understand past and possible future plant community changes.
Heidi Horn hahorn8@gmail.com Cameron Currie Dynamics and specificity of host-microbe symbiosis in fungus-growing ants; exploring the evolution and diversity of secondary metabolite production in host-associated microbes.
Lily Khadempour khadempour@wisc.edu Cameron Currie Microbial mediation of herbivory in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens.
Jennifer Knickelbine knickelbine@wisc.edu Antony Stretton Effects of Neuropeptide-like Proteins (NLPs) on Locomotion in the Nematode Ascaris suum.
Aaron Koning koning@wisc.edu Pete McIntyre Aquatic food webs and various aspects of nutrient cycling using stable isotopes within the Mekong River Basin of Southeast Asia.
Paul Mathewson mathewson@wisc.edu Warren Porter I use mechanistic modeling to help predict the impact of global warming on mammals in North America. This modeling uses looks at how animal morphology and physiology interacts with microclimate conditions to determine behavioral constraints and requirements (e.g., food/water requirements or activity hours). We can map across the landscape to help predict distributions, and then investigate how climate change may affect the animal from a physiological perspective.
Amanda McCormick amccormick4@wisc.edu Tony Ives
Devin Merullo dmerullo@wisc.edu Lauren Riters The neurobiology of vocal communication in songbirds, focusing on how motivation and the neural reward system influence singing behavior in European starlings.
Danny Minahan dfminahan@wisc.edu Johanne Brunet The foraging behavior of diverse bee pollinators from an evolutionary and ecological perspective.
Robert Mooney rjmooney@wisc.edu Pete McIntyre
Lucas Nell
lnell@wisc.edu
Tony Ives
 
Andrew Ontano
ontano@wisc.edu
Prashant Sharma
 
Joseph Phillips jsphillips2@wisc.edu Tony Ives Population and community ecology at Lake Myvatn, Iceland.
Josh Pultorak pultorak@wisc.edu Catherine Marler Mate fidelity, mate attraction, and intersexual dynamics in muroid rodents through the lens of ultrasonic vocal communication: biosocial factors influencing vocal profiles and incentive salience of vocalizations in disparate rodent models, Rattus norvegicus and the monogamous and biparental Peromyscus californicus.
Irina Sedykh sedykh@wisc.edu Jenya Grinblat
Quinn Sorenson qsorenson@wisc.edu Ellen Damschen
Jeremy Spool spool@wisc.edu Lauren Riters The vocal behavior between different social contexts in songbirds, by way of studying the neural mechanisms governing its expression.
Amy Uhrin uhrin@wisc.edu Monica Turner Influence of hydrodynamic setting on the spatial configuration of seagrass landscapes of coastal North Carolina.
Elena West elena.west@wisc.edu William Karasov Impact of resource subsidies on the foraging ecology of Steller's Jays in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California.
Carly Ziter ziter@wisc.edu Monica Turner I am interested in the role of landscape structure in ecosystem service provision, and how management can effect synergies and tradeoffs between multiple ecosystem services in temperate landscapes.