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Zoology

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Monica G. Turner

Research  |  Teaching  |  Publications 

Professor
432 Birge Hall
Office: (608) 262-2592
Lab: (608) 265-8001
Affiliations:

email Monica Turnerturnermg@wisc.edu     Monica Turner Lab WebpageLab Webpage       Monica Turner CV  Full CV  Monica Turner BioBrief Bio

 


 

Research Interests

    My research emphasizes ecological dynamics at broad scales and the influence of spatial heterogeneity on ecological processes; much of my work focuses on understanding the causes and ecological consequences of landscape pattern. Current research themes include the following. (1) My long-term research in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem addresses the role of natural disturbances in the landscape and their importance for vegetation and ecosystem processes. We continue to study post-fire succession and ecosystem processes in areas burned by the 1988 Yellowstone Fires and re-sampled many of our permanent plots in 2012 and 2013. We also are studying the consequences of native bark beetle outbreaks on lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir forests in Greater Yellowstone, including whether beetle-caused tree mortality changes the likelihood of subsequent forest fire, and how post-outbreak salvage harvesting affects the forest. Other current research examines how climate change may alter the frequency of large fires and, in turn, change vegetation patterns and carbon storage across landscapes of the northern Rocky Mountains. (2) In the Southern Appalachian Mountains, as part of the Coweeta Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site, we are studying how past and contemporary land use affect forest understory plants. Currently, we are exploring the effects of land use and climate on ecosystem services and biodiversity in the landscape. (3) We are examining the potential impacts of increased bioenergy production on terrestrial wildlife, especially grassland birds, in southern Wisconsin in collaboration with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR). (4) We study the consequences of land-use and climate change on land-water interactions in Wisconsin as part of the North Temperate Lakes LTER site and an NSF-funded Water Sustainability and Climate project. We seek to understand the spatial interactions among multiple ecosystem services in the Yahara Basin of southern Wisconsin and how these services may differ among alternative scenarios. In addition, in collaboration with the Wisconsin DNR, we are investigating how and why lake water clarity varies across the state and how it may change in the future. (5) We are also exploring disturbance dynamics of seagrass landscapes off the coast of North Carolina and how seagrass spatial patterns are related to hydrodynamic variability. The research projects in my lab are diverse, yet they share a common theme of examining the causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity in ecological systems.


Teaching

    Courses:

    Zoology 152:  Introductory Biology
    Zoology 879:  Advanced Landscape Ecology
    Zoology 956: Seminar-Ecology


    Note to prospective graduate students:

    I look for bright, enthusiastic, hard-working students who are interested in ecology, specifically in some aspect of landscape ecology (defined very broadly) and who are interested in both field and modeling studies. Opportunities vary with current projects and funding levels, and prospective students should check my lab web page to see what research is underway. 



    Graduate students currently supervised:

    • Catherine Frock, MS candidate - Patterns of seed predation in postfire forests of Greater Yellowstone
    • Rose Graves, PhD candidate - Effects of land-use and climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Southern Appalachian Mountains
    • Winslow Hansen, PhD candidate - Postfire tree regeneration and forest resilience in Greater Yellowstone
    • Brian Harvey, PhD candidate - Effects of bark beetle outbreak on fire severity and tree regeneration in lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir forests of Greater Yellowstone
    • Jiangxiao Qiu, PhD candidate - Tradeoffs and synergies among ecosystem services in the Yahara Watershed
    • Amy Uhrin, PhD candidate - Disturbance dynamics in coastal seascapes
    • Carly Ziter, PhD candidate - Landscape patterns of ecosystem services


    Postdoctoral associates currently mentored:

    • Peter Blank, Effects of bioenergy crop production on wildlife populations in southern Wisconsin
    • Kevin Rose, Landscape patterns of lake water clarity in Wisconsin


    Students supervised who recently earned graduate degrees:

    Michelle M. Jackson, PhD Zoology, 2012 Abstract
    Jake Griffin, PhD Zoology, 2011 Abstract
    Heather Lumpkin, MS Zoology, 2011 Abstract
    Martin Simard, PhD Zoology, 2010 Abstract
    Tim Kuhman, PhD Zoololgy, 2009 Abstract
    Thomas P Albright, PhD Zoology, 2007. Abstract
    Anna E. Marburg, PhD Zoology, 2006.  Abstract
    Kathryn I. Predick, PhD Zoology, Spring 2006.  Abstract
    Elizabeth A. Levitt, MS Zoology, 2006. Abstract
    Alysa J. Remsburg, PhD Zoology 2007, MS Zoology, Spring 2005 Abstract
    Jennifer M. Fraterrigo, PhD Zoology, Spring 2005 Abstract
    James D. Forester, PhD Zoology, Summer 2005, MS 2002 Abstract
    Anna Sugden-Newbery, MS Zoology 2003 Abstract
    Katie Predick, MS Zoology 2002 Abstract
    Tania Schoennagel, PhD Zoology and Botany 2002 Abstract
    Daniel M Kashian, PhD Zoology and Forest Ecology & Management 2002 Abstract
    Mark A Smith, PhD Zoology and Wildlife Ecology 2002 Abstract
    Mark D. Dixon, Ph.D. Zoology 2001 Abstract
    Mark Wegener, MS IES 2001; co-advised with Tom Lillesand
    Christopher Mitchell, MS Zoology 2000 Abstract
    Jill Schnaiberg, MS IES, 2000; co-advised with Nancy Langston
    Sarah E Gergel, MS and PhD Zoology 2000 Abstract


Selected Publications

Books/Monographs published:

  • Gergel, S. E. and M. G. Turner, editors.  2002.  Learning landscape ecology: a practical guide to concepts and techniques.  Springer-Verlag, New York. 

  • Lovett, G. M., C. G. Jones, M. G. Turner and K. C. Weathers, editors. 2005. Ecosystem function in heterogeneous landscapes. Springer-Verlag, New York.

  • Wiens, J. A., M. R. Moss, M. G. Turner and D. J. Mladenoff, editors.  2007. Foundation papers in landscape ecology.  Columbia University Press, New York.

Papers in refereed national/international journals:

(* indicates papers led by a student or postdoc in my lab)

  • Turner, M. G., D. C. Donato and W. H. Romme. 2013. Consequences of spatial heterogeneity for ecosystem services in changing forest landscapes: priorities for future research. Landscape Ecology 28:1081-1097.
  • *Anderson, D. P., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson, T. P. Albright, R. K. Peet and A. Wieben. 2013. Predicting Microstegium vimineum invasion in natural plant communities of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains, USA. Biological Invasions 15:1217-1230.
  • *Donato, D. C., B. J. Harvey, M. Simard, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2013. Bark beetle effects on fuel profiles across a range of stand structures in Douglas-fir forests of Greater Yellowstone, USA. Ecological Applications 23:3-20.
  • *Donato, D. C., M. Simard, W. H. Romme, B. J. Harvey and M. G. Turner. 2013. Evaluating post-outbreak management effects on future fuel profiles and stand structure in bark beetle-impacts forests of Greater Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management 303:160-174.
  • Franks, S., J. G. Masek and M. G. Turner. 2013. Monitoring forest regrowth following large scale fire using satellite data—A case study of Yellowstone National Park. Submitted to European Journal of Remote Sensing 46:561-569.
  • *Griffin, J. M., M. Simard and M. G. Turner. 2013. Salvage harvest effects on advance tree regeneration, soil nitrogen, and fuels following mountain pine beetle outbreak in lodgepole pine. Forest Ecology and Management 291:228-239.
  • *Harvey, B. J., D. C. Donato, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2013. Influence of recent bark beetle outbreak on wildfire severity and post-fire tree regeneration in montane Douglas-fir forests. Ecology 94:2465-2486.
  • *Jackson, M. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2013. Time since logging influences performance and population dynamics of a native understory herb in Southern Appalachian forests. Forest Ecology and Management 304:444-454.
  • Kashian, D. M., W. H. Romme, D. B. Tinker, M. G. Turner and M. G. Ryan. 2013. Post-fire changes in forest carbon storage over a 300-year chronosequence of Pinus contorta-dominated forests. Ecological Monographs 83:49-66.
  • *Kuhman, T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2013. Why does land-use history facilitate non-native plant invasion? A field experiment with Celastrus orbiculatus. Biological Invasions 15:613-626.
  • *Qiu, J. and M. G. Turner. 2013. Spatial interactions among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural watershed. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110:12149-12154.
  • Stephens, S. L., J. K. Agee, P. Z. Fulé, M. P. North, W. H. Romme, T. W. Swetnam, and M. G. Turner. 2013. Managing forests and fire in changing climates. Science 342:41-42.
  • *Griffin, J. M. and M. G. Turner. 2012. Bark beetle outbreak induces similar changes to the nitrogen cycle in contrasting conifer forests. Oecologia 170:551-565.
  • *Jackson, M. M., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson and A. R. Ives. 2012. Seeing the forest and the trees: multilevel models reveal both species and community patterns. Ecosphere 3(9):79. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00116.1
  • *Lumpkin, H. A., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2012. Climate and exurban development affect nest predation and nest predator presence in the Southern Appalachians. Conservation Biology 26:679-688.
  • *Simard, M., E. N. Powell, K. F. Raffa and M. G. Turner. 2012. What explains landscape patterns of bark beetle outbreaks in Greater Yellowstone? Global Ecology and Biogeography 21:556-567.
  • *Simard, M., W. H. Romme, J. M. Griffin and M. G. Turner. 2012. Do mountain pine beetle oubreaks change the probability of active crown fire in lodgepole pine forests? Reply. Ecology 93:946-950.
  • Smithwick, E. A. H., K. J. Naithani, T. C. Balser, W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner. 2012. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance PLoS ONE 7(11):e50597.
  • *Albright, T. P., M. G. Turner and J. A. Cardille. 2011. Characterizing spatial pattern in biogeographic data. Pages 419-434 In: A. C. Millington, M. Blumler and U. Schickhoff, editors. The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography. SAGE Publications Ltd., London.
  • *Buffam, I., M. G. Turner, A. Desai, P. J. Hanson, J. Rusak, N. Lottig and S. R. Carpenter. 2011. Integrating aquatic and terrestrial components to construct a complete carbon budget for a north temperate lake district. Global Change Biology 17:1193-1211.
  • *Griffin, J. M., M. G. Turner and M. Simard. 2011. Nitrogen cycling following mountain pine beetle disturbance in lodgepole pine forests of Greater Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management 261:1077-1089.
  • *Kuhman T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2011. Agricultural land-use history increases non-native plant invasion in a Southern Appalachian forest a century after abandonment. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 41:920-929.
  • Romme, W. H., M. S. Boyce, R. E. Gresswell, E. H. Merrill, G. W. Minshall, C. Whitlock and M. G. Turner. 2011. Twenty years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires: lessons about disturbance and ecosystems. Ecosystems 14:1196-1215.
  • *Simard, M., W. H. Romme, J. M. Griffin and M. G. Turner. 2011. Do mountain pine beetle outbreaks change the probability of active crown fire in lodgepole pine forests? Ecological Monographs 81:3-24. (Open access: http://esa.org/papers/)
  • Westerling, A. L., M. G. Turner, E. A. H. Smithwick, W. H. Romme and M. G. Ryan. 2011. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108:13165-13170. (Open access: www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1110199108).
  • Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker, and J. Zhu. 2011. Variation in aboveground cover influences soil nitrogen availability at fine spatial scales following severe fire in subalpine conifer forests. Ecosystems (In press).
  • *Albright, T. P., M. G. Turner and J. A. Cardille. 2011. Characterizing spatial pattern in biogeographic data. In: A. C. Millington, M. Blumler and U. Schickhoff, editors. The SAGE Handbook of Biogeography. Sage Publications Ltd. (In press).
  • *Buffam, I., M. G. Turner, A. Desai, P. J. Hanson, J. Rusak, N. Lottig and S. R. Carpenter. 2011. Integrating aquatic and terrestrial components to construct a complete carbon budget for a north temperate lake district. Global Change Biology 17:1193-1211.
  • *Griffin, J. M., M. G. Turner and M. Simard. 2011. Nitrogen cycling following mountain pine beetle disturbance in lodgepole pine forests of Greater Yellowstone. Forest Ecology & Management 261:1077-1089.
  • *Kuhman T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2011. Agricultural land-use history increases non-native plant invasion in a Southern Appalachian forest a century after abandonment. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 41:920-929.
  • Romme, W. H., M. S. Boyce, R. E. Gresswell, E. H. Merrill, G. W. Minshall, C. Whitlock and M. G. Turner. 2011. Twenty years after the 1998 Yellowstone fires: lessons about disturbance and ecosystems. Ecosystems (In press).
  • *Simard, M., W. H. Romme, J. M. Griffin and M. G. Turner. 2011. Do mountain pine beetle outbreaks change the probability of active crown fire in lodgepole pine forests? Ecological Monographs 81:3-24. (Available as open access at: http://esa.org/papers/)
  • *Simard, M., E. N. Powell, K. F. Raffa and M. G. Turner. 2011. What explains landscape patterns of bark beetle outbreaks in Greater Yellowstone? Global Ecology and Biogeography (In press).
  • Smithwick, E. A. H., A. L. Westerling, M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme, M. G. Ryan. 2011. Vulnerability of landscape carbon fluxes to future climate and fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Pages 131-134 In: C. Anderson, ed. Questioning Greater Yellowstone's Future: Climate, Land Use, and Invasive Species. Proc. 10th Biennial Scientific Conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Yellowstone National Park, WY, and Laramie, WY: Yellowstone Center for Resources and University of Wyoming William D. Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources.
  • Westerling, A. L., M. G. Turner, E. A. H. Smithwick, W. H. Romme and M. G. Ryan. 2011. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Open access, and available online at: www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1110199108).
  • Turner, M. G. 2010. Disturbance and landscape dynamics in a changing world. Ecology 91:2833-2849.
  • *Buffam, I., S. R. Carpenter, W. Yeck, P. C. Hanson and M. G. Turner. 2010. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: predicting peat depth in a north-temperate lake district. Journal of Geophysical Research 115, G01005, doi:10.1029/2009JG001034.
  • Gleick, P. H., and many, many signers, including M. G. Turner. 2010. Climate change and the integrity of science. Science 328:689-690. (Letter)
  • *Kuhman, T. R., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2010. Effects of land-use history and the contemporary landscape on non-native plant invasion at local and regional scales in the forest-dominated southern Appalachians. Landscape Ecology 25:1433-1445.
  • Turner, M. G., E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker and W. H. Romme. 2009. Variation in foliar nitrogen and aboveground net primary production in young postfire lodgepole pine. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 39:1024-1035.
  • *Cardille, J. A., S. R. Carpenter, J. A. Foley, P. C. Hanson, M. G. Turner and J. A. Vano. 2009. Climate change and lakes: Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets, Journal of Geophysical Research 114:G03011, doi:10.1029/2008JG000891.
  • Fraterrigo, J. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2009. Land-use history and the response of understory herbaceous plants to nitrogen fertilization. Forest Ecology and Management 257:2182-2188.
  • Fraterrigo, J. M., S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2009. Joint effects of habitat configuration and temporal stochasticity on population dynamics. Landscape Ecology 24:863-877.
  • *Marburg, A. E., S. B. Bassak, T. K. Kratz and M. G. Turner. 2009. The demography of coarse wood in north-temperate lakes. Freshwater Biology 54:1110-1119.
  • *Predick, K. I., S. E. Gergel and M. G. Turner. 2009. Effect of flood regime on tree growth in the floodplain and surrounding uplands of the Wisconsin River. River Research and Applications 25:283-296.
  • *Remsburg, A. J. and M. G. Turner. 2009. Aquatic and terrestrial drivers of dragonfly (order Odonata) assemblages within and among north-temperate lakes. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 28:44-56.
  • Romme, W. H., D. B. Tinker, G. H. Stakes, and M. G. Turner. 2009. Does inorganic nitrogen availability limit plant growth 3-5 years after fire in a Wyoming lodgepole pine forest? Forest Ecology & Management 257:829-835.
  • *Smithwick, E. A. H., M. G. Ryan, D. M. Kashian, W. H. Romme, D. B. Tinker and M. G. Turner. 2009. Modeling the effects of fire and climate change on carbon and nitrogen storage in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands. Global Change Biology 15:535-548.
  • *Smithwick, E. A. H., D. M. Kashian, M. G. Ryan and M. G. Turner. 2009. Long-term ecosystem nitrogen storage and soil nitrogen availability in post-fire lodgepole pine ecosystems. Ecosystems 12:792-806.
  • *Albright, T. P., D. P. Anderson, N. S. Keuler, S. M. Pearson and M. G. Turner. 2009. The spatial legacy of introduction: Celastrus orbiculatus in the southern Appalachians, USA. Journal of Applied Ecology 46:1229-1236.
  • Turner, M. G., E. H. Stanley, M. Bürgi and D. J. Mladenoff. 2008. Changes in the Wisconsin River and its floodplain. Pages 229-249 In: D. M. Waller and T. P. Rooney, editors. The vanishing present. Wisconsin’s changing lands, waters and wildlife. University of Chicago Press.
  • *Anderson, D. P., J. D. Forester, and M. G. Turner. 2008. When to slow down? Elk residence rates on a heterogeneous landscape. Journal of Mammalogy 89:105-114.
  • *Forester, J. D., D. P. Anderson and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape and local factors affecting northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) recruitment in the Chequamegon National Forest, Wisconsin (USA). American Midland Naturalist 160:438-453.
  • *Metzger, K.L., E. A. H. Smithwick, D. B. Tinker, W. H. Romme, T. C. Balser and M. G. Turner. 2008. Influence of pine saplings and coarse wood on nitrogen mineralization and microbial communities in young post-fire Pinus contorta. Forest Ecology and Management 256:59-67.
  • Moore, S., T. Wallington, R. Hobbs, P. Ehrlich, C. S. Holling, S. Levin, D. Lindenmeyer, C. Pahl-Wostl, H. Possingham, M. Turner and M. Westoby. 2008. Diversity in current ecological thinking: implications for environmental management. Environmental Management. Available online: DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9187-2
  • *Predick, K. I. and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape configuration and flood frequency influence invasive shrubs in floodplain forests of the Wisconsin River (USA). Journal of Ecology 96:91-102.
  • Raffa, K. F., B. H. Aukema, B. J. Bentz, A. L. Carroll, J. A. Hicke, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2008. Cross-scale drivers of natural disturbances prone to anthropogenic amplification: the dynamics of bark beetle eruptions. BioScience 58:501-517.
  • Schoennagel, T., E. A. H. Smithwick and M. G. Turner. 2008. Landscape heterogeneity following large fires: insights from Yellowstone National Park, USA. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17:742-753.
  • Turner, M. G. and J. A. Cardille. 2007. Spatial heterogeneity and ecosystem processes. Pages 62-77 in: J. Wu and R. J. Hobbs, editors. Key topics in landscape ecology. Cambridge University Press.
  • Turner, M. G., E. A. H. Smithwick, K. L. Metzger, D. B. Tinker and W. H. Romme. 2007. Inorganic nitrogen availability following severe stand-replacing fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 104:4782-4789.
  • Turner, M. G., D. M. Turner, W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker. 2007. Cone production in young post-fire Pinus contorta stands in Greater Yellowstone (USA). Forest Ecology and Management 242:119-206.
  • Agrawal, A. A., D. D. Ackerly, F. Adler, B. Arnold, C. Caceres, D. F. Doak, E. Post, P. Hudson, J. Maron, K. A. Mooney, M. Power, D. Schemske, J. Stachowica, S. Strauss, M. G. Turner, E. Werner. 2007. Filling key gaps in population and community ecology. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 5:145-152.
  • Bolliger, J., H. H. Wagner, and M. G. Turner. 2007. Identifying and quantifying landscape patterns in space and time. Pages 177-194 in: F. Kienast, O. Wildi and S. Ghosh, editors. A changing world: challenges for landscape research. Springer Landscape Series
  • *Cardille, J. A., S. R. Carpenter, M. T. Coe, P. R. Hanson, J. A. Foley, M. G. Turner and J. A. Vano. 2007. Carbon and water cycling in lake-rich landscapes: landscape connections, lake hydrology and biogeochemistry. Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences 112:G02031, doi:10.1029/2006JF000200.
  • Carpenter, S.R., B.J. Benson, R. Biggs, J.W. Chipman, J.A. Foley, S.A. Golding, R.B. Hammer, P.C. Hanson, P.T.J. Johnson, A.M. Kamarainen, T.K. Kratz, R.C. Lathrop, K.D. McMahon, B. Provencher, J.A. Rusak, C.T. Solomon, E.H. Stanley, M. G. Turner, M.J. Vander Zanden, C.-H. Wu and H. Yuan. 2007. Understanding regional change: comparison of two lake districts. BioScience 57:323-335.
  • *Forester, J. D., D. P. Anderson and M. G. Turner. 2007. Do high-density patches of coarse wood and regenerating saplings create browsing refugia for aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Yellowstone National Park (USA)? Forest Ecology & Management 253:211-219.
  • *Forester, J. D., A. R. Ives, M. G. Turner, D. P. Anderson, D. Fortin, H. Beyer, D. W. Smith and M. S. Boyce. 2007. Using state-space models to link patterns of elk (Cervus elaphus) movement to landscape characteristics in Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Monographs 77:285-299.
  • Peters, D. P. C., B. T. Bestelmeyer and M. G. Turner. 2007. Cross-scale interactions and changing pattern-process relationships: consequences for system dynamics. Ecosystems 10:790-796.
  • Roth, B. M., I. C. Kaplan, G. G. Sass, P. T. Johnson, A. E. Marburg, A. C. Yannarell, T. D. Havlicek, T. V. Willis, M. G. Turner and S. R. Carpenter. 2007. Linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems: the role of coarse wood in lake food webs. Ecological Modelling 203:439-452.
  • Turner, M. G., E. A. H. Smithwick, K. L. Metzger, D. B. Tinker and W. H. Romme.  2007. Inorganic nitrogen availability following severe stand-replacing fire in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (In press).
  • Turner, M. G., D. M. Turner, W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker.  2007. Cone production in young post-fire Pinus contorta stands in Greater Yellowstone (USA).  Forest Ecology and Management (In press).
  • Agrawal, A. A., D. D. Ackerly, F. Adler, B. Arnold, C. Caceres, D. F. Doak, E. Post, P. Hudson, J. Maron, K. A. Mooney, M. Power, D. Schemske, J. Stachowica, S. Strauss, M. G. Turner, E. Werner. 2007.  Filling key gaps in population and community ecology.  Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment (In press).
  • *Cardille, J. A., Carpenter, S. R., Coe, M. T., Hanson, P. R., Foley, J. A., Turner, M. G., and J. A. Vano. 2007. Carbon and water cycling in lake-rich landscapes:  landscape connections, lake hydrology and biogeochemistry. Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences. (In press).
  • Carpenter, S.R., B.J. Benson, R. Biggs, J.W. Chipman, J.A. Foley, S.A. Golding, R.B. Hammer, P.C. Hanson, P.T.J. Johnson, A.M. Kamarainen, T.K. Kratz, R.C. Lathrop, K.D. McMahon, B. Provencher, J.A. Rusak, C.T. Solomon, E.H. Stanley, M.G. Turner, M.J. Vander Zanden, C.-H. Wu and H. Yuan.  2007. Understanding regional change:  comparison of two lake districts.  BioScience (In press).

  • *Dixon, M. D. and M. G. Turner.  2007. Simulated recruitment of riparian trees under natural and regulated flow regimes on the Wisconsin River, USA. River Research and Applications (In press).
  • *Forester, J. D., A. R. Ives, M. G. Turner, D. P. Anderson, D. Fortin, H. Beyer, D. W. Smith and M. S. Boyce.  2007. Using state-space models to link patterns of elk (Cervus elaphus) movement to landscape characteristics in Yellowstone National Park.  Ecology (In press).
  • Roth, B. M., I. C. Kaplan, G. G. Sass, P. T. Johnson, A. E. Marburg, A. C. Yannarell, T. D. Havlicek, T. V. Willis, M. G. Turner and S. R. Carpenter.  2007. Linking terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems: the role of coarse wood in lake food webs. Ecological Modelling (In press).
  • *Fraterrigo, J. M., T. C. Balser and M. G. Turner. 2006. Microbial community variation and its relationship with nitrogen mineralization in historically altered forests. Ecology 87:570-579.
  • *Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner and S. M. Pearson.  2006.  Plant allocation and growth in the herb layer of historically altered forests.  Journal of Ecology 94:548-557.
  • *Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner and S. M. Pearson.  2006. Interactions between past land use, life-history traits and understory spatial heterogeneity.  Landscape Ecology 21:777-790.
  • Groffman, P.M., J. S. Baron, T. Blett, A. J. Gold, I. Goodman, L. H. Gunderson, B. M. Levinson, M. A. Palmer, H. W. Paerl, G. D. Peterson, N. L. Poff, D. W. Rejeski, J. F. Reynolds, M. G. Turner, K. C. Weathers, and J.A. Wiens. 2006. Ecological thresholds:  The key to successful environmental management or an important concept with no practical application?  Ecosystems 9:1-13.
  • Kashian, D. M., W. H. Romme, D. B. Tinker, M. G. Turner and M. G. Ryan. 2006. Carbon cycling and storage across coniferous landscapes: linking fire frequency, post-fire recovery, and ecosystem processes.  BioScience 56:598-606.
  • *Marburg, A. E., M. G. Turner and T. K. Kratz.  2006. Natural and anthropogenic variation in coarse wood among and within lakes. Journal of Ecology 94:558-568.
  • *Metzger, K. L., W. H. Romme and M. G. Turner.  2006.  Foliar nitrogen in early postfire vegetation in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Wyoming, USA).  Forest Ecology and Management 227:22-30.
  • *Remsburg, A. J. and M. G. Turner.  2006. Amount, position and age of coarse wood influence litter decomposition within and among young post-fire Pinus contorta stands. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 36:2112-2123.
  • Sass, G. G., J. F. Kitchell, S. R. Carpenter, T. R. Hrabik, A. Marburg, and M. G. Turner. 2006. Fish community and food web responses to a whole-lake removal of coarse woody habitat.  Fisheries 31:321-330.
  • *Schoennagel, T., M.G. Turner, A. Fall and D. M. Kashian. 2006. Influence of fire regimes on lodgepole pine stand age and density across the Yellowstone National Park (USA) landscape.  Landscape Ecology 21:1281-1296.
  • Turner, M. G. 2005. Landscape ecology in North America: past, present and future. Ecology 86:1967-1974.
  • Turner, M. G. 2005. Landscape ecology: what is the state of the science?  Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 36:319-344.
  • *Anderson, D. P., M. G. Turner, J. D. Forester, J. Zhu, M. S. Boyce, H. Beyer and L. Stowell.  2005. Scale-dependent summer habitat use by elk (Cervus elaphus) in Wisconsin, USA.  Journal of Wildlife Management 69:298-310.
  • *Anderson, D.P., J. D. Forester, M. G. Turner, J. L. Frair, E. H. Merrill, D. Haydon, D. Fortin, J. S. Mao, M. S. Boyce, J. Fryxell, and H. Beyer.  2005.  Factors influencing seasonal home-range sizes in elk (Cervus canadensis) in North American landscapes.  Landscape Ecology 20:257-271.
  • *Cardille, J. A., M. G. Turner,M. Clayton, S. Price, and S. E. Gergel. 2005. METALAND:  Characterizing spatial patterns and statistical context of landscape metrics.  BioScience 55:983-988.
  • *Fraterrigo, J. M., M. G. Turner, S. M. Pearson, and P. Dixon.  2005.  Effects of past land use on spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients in Southern Appalachian forests.  Ecological Monographs 75:215-230.
  • *Kashian, D. M., M.G.Turner, and W.H. Romme. 2005. Changes in leaf area and stemwood increment with stand development in Yellowstone National Park: Relationships between forest stand structure and function. Ecosystems 8:48-61.
  • *Kashian, D. M., M. G. Turner, W. H. Romme and C. J. Lorimer.  2005. Variability and convergence in stand structure with forest development on a fire-dominated landscape. Ecology 86:643-654.
  • Palmer, M.A., E. Bernhardt, E. Chornesky, S.L. Collins, A. Dobson, C. Duke, B. Gold, R. Jacobson, S. Kingsland, R. Kranz, M. Mappin, F. Micheli, J. Morse, M. Pace, M. Pascual, S. Palumbi, J. Reichman, W.H. Schlesinger, A. Townsend, M. G. Turner, and M. Vasquez.  2005. Ecology for a Crowded Planet: a Science Action Plan for the 21st Century.  Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 3:4-11.
  • Romme, W. H., M. G. Turner, G. A. Tuskan and R. A. Reed.  2005. Establishment, persistence and growth of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings in Yellowstone National Park.  Ecology 86:404-418.
  • *Smithwick, E. A. H., M.  C. Mack, M. G. Turner, F. S. Chapin III, J. Zhu and T. C. Balser. 2005. Spatial heterogeneity and soil nitrogen dynamics in a burned black spruce forest stand: distinct controls at different scales.  Biogeochemistry 76:517-537.
  • *Smithwick, E. A. H., M. G. Turner, M. C. Mack, and F. S. Chapin, III. 2005. Post-fire soil N cycling in northern conifer forests affected by severe, stand-replacing wildfires. Ecosystems 8:163-181.
  • *Smithwick, E.A.H., M. G. Turner, K. L. Metzger, and T. C. Balser. 2005. Variation in NH4+ mineralization and microbial communities with stand age in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, Yellowstone National Park (USA).  Soil Biology and Biogeochemistry 37:1546-1559
  • Turner, M. G., S. E. Gergel, M. D. Dixon and J. R. Miller. 2004. Distribution and abundance of trees in floodplain forests of the Wisconsin River:  environmental influences at different scales.  Journal of Vegetation Science 15:729-738.
  • Turner, M. G., D. B. Tinker, W. H. Romme, D. M. Kashian and C. M. Litton. 2004. Landscape patterns of sapling density, leaf area, and aboveground net primary production in postfire lodgepole pine forests, Yellowstone National Park (USA). Ecosystems 7:751-775.
  • *Kashian, D. M., D. B. Tinker, M. G. Turner and F. L. Scarpace.  2004. Spatial heterogeneity of lodgepole pine sapling densities following the 1988 fires in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 34 2263-2276.
  • *Miller, J. R., M. D. Dixon, and M. G. Turner. 2004. Response of avian communities in large-river floodplains to environmental variation at multiple scales. Ecological Applications 14:1394-1410.
  • *Miller, J. R., M. G. Turner, E. A. H. Smithwick, C. L. Dent and E.H. Stanley.  2004. Spatial extrapolation:  the science of predicting ecological patterns and processes.  BioScience 54:310-320.
  • Palmer, M. A., E. S. Berhnhardt, E. A. Chornesky, S. L. Collins, A. P. Dobson, C. S. Duke, B. D. Gold, R. Jacobson, S. Kingsland, R. Kranz, M. J. Mappin, M. L. Martinez, F. Micheli, J. L. Morse, M. L. Pace, M. Pascual, S. Palumbi, O. J. Reichman, A. L. Simons, A. Townsend and M. G. Turner.  2004. Ecology for a crowded planet.  Science 304:1251-1252.
  • *Schoennagel, T., D. M. Waller, M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme.  2004. The effect of fire interval on understory communities in Yellowstone National Park (USA). Journal of Vegetation Science 15:797-806.
  • Turner, M. G., S. Collins, A. Lugo, J. Magnuson, S. Rupp and F. Swanson.  2003. Long-term ecological research on disturbance and ecological response. BioScience 53:46-56.
  • Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme, R. A. Reed and G. A. Tuskan.  2003.  Postfire aspen seedling recruitment across the Yellowstone (USA) landscape. Landscape Ecology 18: 127-140.
  • Turner, M. G., S. M. Pearson, P. Bolstad and D. N. Wear. 2003.  Effects of land-cover change on spatial pattern of forest communities in the southern Appalachian Mountains (USA). Landscape Ecology 18:449-464.
  • Turner, M. G., W. H. Romme and D. B. Tinker.  2003. Surprises and lessons from the 1988 Yellowstone fires. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 1(7):351-358.
  • Boyce, M. S., J. S. Mao, E. H. Merrill, D. Fortin, M. G. Turner, J. Fryxell, and P. Turchin.  2003.  Scale and heterogeneity in habitat selection by elk in Yellowstone National Park. EcoScience 10:421-431.
  • Freeman, R. E., E. H. Stanley and M. G. Turner.  2003. Analysis and conservation implications of landscape change in the Wisconsin River floodplain, USA. Ecological Applications 13:416-431.
  • *Schoennagel, T., M. G. Turner and W. H. Romme. 2003.  The influence of fire interval and serotiny on postfire lodgepole pine density in Yellowstone National Park. Ecology 84:1967-1978.
  • *Burgi, M. and M. G. Turner.  2002.  Factors and processes shaping land cover and land cover changes along the Wisconsin River, USA.  Ecosystems 5:184-201.
  • *Dixon, M. D., M. G. Turner and C. Jin.  2002.  Distribution of riparian tree seedlings on Wisconsin River sandbars: controls at different spatial scales. Ecological Monographs 72:465-485.
  • *Gergel, S. E., M. D. Dixon and M. G. Turner.  2002. Consequences of human-altered floods: levees, floods and floodplain forests along the Wisconsin River. Ecological Applications 12:1755-1770.
  • *Gergel, S. E., M. G. Turner, J. R. Miller, J. M. Melack and E. H. Stanley.  2002.  Landscape indicators of human impacts to river-floodplain systems.  Aquatic Sciences 64:118-128.
  • *Mitchell, C. E., M. G. Turner and S. M. Pearson. 2002. Effects of historical land use and forest patch size on myrmecochores and ant communities. Ecological Applications 12:1364-1377.
  • *Schnaiberg, J., J. Riera, M. G. Turner and P. R.Voss.  2002.  Explaining human settlement patterns in a recreational lake district: Vilas County, Wisconsin, USA. Environmental Management 30:24-34.
  • *Smith, M. A., M. G. Turner and D. H. Rusch.  2002.  The effect of military training activity on eastern lupine and the Karner blue butterfly on Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. Environmental Management 29: 102-115.
 
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